Tag Archives: fiction

Recommended Book: THE NIGHT CIRCUS by Erin Morgenstern


THE NIGHT CIRCUS
Erin Morgenstern

A black and white circus only open at night; tents and performances that blend the extraordinary with the real; an exhibition competition displayed for all the world to see. Those are the heart and soul of The Night Circus.

From a very young age, both Celia Bowen and Marco have been chosen to be the competitors in a dangerous game involving manipulation and enchantment. They train in vastly different methods under completely different teachers until the venue for their competition is set. From there, their battle spans years and continents and involves more and more people who have come to love the circus as their own. And in the process, the two are drawn to one another.

This tale is told magically, with prose that takes you on a journey through this circus, describing in intricate detail the tents, the performers, the manipulated elements that astound and spark excitement. There is love invested in these details that bring this setting to life, moreso than even the characters that walk and live and love among the black and white tents.

While there is a large cast, this is not a character story. Though there is romance, it is quick and distant rather than intimate. The mystery of The Night Circus is less mystery than it is mystical, with us along for the ride to discover just what might happen to all the people who have become intertwined with the venue.

This is, first and foremost, a story about a circus, and the love one has for that own special place filled with the people we care about most. I’d recommend this story for those needing to be stolen away to a place of wonder, for those wanting to enjoy the reading more than getting to the end of the journey. For those who love circuses and for those who don’t, but would love the chance to fall in love with one anyway.


“Dance of Wood and Grace” Published in Zooscape Magazine!

Dance of Wood and Grace has been published in the March 2021 issue of Zooscape Magazine! This is my second publication of the year and my first appearance in this adorable furry magazine.

Dance of Wood and Grace is about a sauropod-like creature named Dirt of CrystalSleep who is born into a city where the caste-system is stringent and specific. Yet, that doesn’t stop him from harboring a whisper-want for something different.

The inspiration for this story came from body mutilation and how in many western cultures and religions those mutilations are frowned upon, to the point where career paths and job security is put at risk because of them. I wanted to explore the idea that many of us don’t settle for the “pure” body we’d been born to, for the image we have, the delight we gain, the feeling of belonging in our own skin, is worth facing off against cultural stigma.

I hope that this story speaks to anyone with piercings, with tattoos, with surgeries of any types or desires for those surgeries, for anyone who has felt looked down upon for their choice in expression of their very selves.

In a metaphorical sense, this story also represents going after that which your are most passionate about, regardless of your level of skill. I know so many people who are miserable in jobs they’re well-suited for, who ache for something different. But again, cultural stigma strikes here as well, pushing us all into shapes and places we would rather not live in.

So I hope dearly that this story speaks to everyone who has ever had a passion and yet was told that they weren’t good enough at it, that they were too old to start a new career or a new hobby or a new anything simply because it’s something you’ve always wanted, something where you find satisfaction and contentment.

I say go after your loves and passions regardless that you may not be the best or that the learning curve may be steep. Because it’s better to love what you do/who you are, than be the best at what you do/who you are.

Dance of Wood and Grace can be read for free here!

<3 Marie C.

Recommended Book: HIGHFIRE by Eoin Colfer


HIGHFIRE
by Eoin Colfer

Deep in the swamps lives a dragon who goes by the name of Vern. Oh, he used to be something grander, a Lord Highfire, but nowadays with the wyverns all but gone, Vern just wants to live alone, enjoy his days in the bayou with his cable and armchair and vodka.

The second lead character in this novel is a fifteen-year old who goes by Squib and who has just the right amount of luck to watch his boss murdered by the local constable, who, just so happens, also is attempting to woo Squib’s mother. Life is complicated. Made more so when he ends up getting tapped to fill some shoes and begin delivering for a real-life dragon who can’t exactly get his alcohol himself. At least not without terrorizing the locals and having to relocate afterwards.

But the local constable wants Squib out of the way and doesn’t mind that way being deep in the depths of the swamp where no one will ever find him. And if a dragon happens to get in the way, well, the constable can work with that too.

Vern might just have to break a few of his own rules and gives his armchair and vodka a break in order to help the first human he’s actually come to care about for a long, long time.

This fantasy novel is a fun, easy read, perfect for a wide variety of ages. It leaves you satisfied without much emotional upheaval other than a happy-minded contentment for having read.


Recommended Book: REMOTE CONTROL by Nnedi Okorafor


REMOTE CONTROLRemote Control by Nnedi Okorafor
by Nnedi Okorafor

Sankofa, the Adopted Daughter of Death, is a young girl protected by a green glow from within that can kill all it encompasses. Everyone knows of her, everyone fears her, and the tales told of her are many and varied.

Remote Control takes you through Sankofa’s life, from her youthful bouts of malaria and her conversations with a mysterious seed, through her attempts to live undisturbed in a world that insists on her evilness. This is a tale about perseverance, prejudice, and home.

There’s a lovely metaphor here for all those who have at some point in their lives felt they ruined everything they touched, who have struggled to find a place where they belong, people who could understand them. For those who feel they hurt those closest to them, and try as they might, always seem to destroy good things around them, this tale can be cathartic.

Yet, this story is also for those who have grown stronger because of the thorns on their path. Sankofa might not be who we are, but there’s a piece of her in all of us.


Recommended Book: SORCERY OF THORNS by Margaret Rogerson


SORCERY OF THORNS
Margaret Rogerson

Books about books are always fun, particularly when those books sing and bite and tell on little girls who aren’t where they should be.

This is a tale about Elisabeth, a young woman who grew up in one of the Great Libraries and was taught how to care for the books within. When a visit from a sorcerer and a subsequent attack leaves a dangerous grimoire stolen, Elizabeth finds herself being dragged to the capital and put on a path to solve the mystery of the sabotage and thievery before the Great Libraries fall to a power beyond imagining.

The cast is rounded out by a somewhat-friendly demon, who likes to turn into a cat, and a young sorcerer, who is somehow even less friendly. The story is engaging and quick, adventurous and fun, perfect for anyone looking for a light romp that takes them through magical libraries we all wish we had grown up within ourselves.