Tag Archives: series

Recommended Book: FUGITIVE TELEMETRY by Martha Wells


FUGITIVE TELEMETRY
by Martha Wells

Murderbot graces my recommendations yet again! Fugitive Telemetry is the sixth installment and fifth novella featuring Murderbot, an android with a penchant for vid dramas who would really rather be doing anything other than work.

In this story, taking place before the novel Network Effect, but after the other four novellas, Murderbot faces an actual murder mystery for the first time, on Preservation Station. It doesn’t actually want to solve the mystery, yet can’t help but feel concerned for the humans who have become its family.

Besides, it might be good to discover something it can do to be considered an equal, providing citizen within Preservation Station.

The mystery takes Murderbot through dealing with humans completely and utterly incapable of doing their own jobs, forces it to prove itself trustworthy to those still concerned with having it running free within their civilization, and has it comparing itself to the service bots who have a symbiotic relationship with the people of Preservation.

I recommend Fugitive Telemetry for anyone already a fan of Murderbot or of Wells in general. For those new to either, I recommend the novellas to anyone who loves more character-focused science-fiction, a dab of humor in the voices they read, and, for this story in particular, who enjoys a fun murder mystery.


April 2019 Recommended Books

One of the books I read this past month was Breadcrumbs, by Anne Ursu–read to my daughter. There were so many references to other famous stories and fairy tales that I realized she wasn’t familiar with yet, so we got an abrupt jump to the length of our list of to-read together.

As for my favorites, these stories I’m recommending because I enjoyed them the most out of everything I read :)

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The Ingenious by Darius Hinks
(Dark Fantasy)

This was my absolute favorite book of April. The description of the City drew me to this novel in the first place–a city that absorbs people, culture and even land and then moves on after a few years to another place, creating a setting filled with thousands of years of possibility and differences. The whole of the story held a haunting, somber feel while you follow a woman dealing with layers of addiction who yet is still striving to stand up to the heavy expectations thrust on her at an early age. I found the story powerful and the writing beautiful, painfully beautiful at times when it seems as if Hinks was mixing the fugue-filled state of Isten within the storytelling.

The Reluctant Queen & The Queen of Sorrow by Sarah Beth Durst
(High Fantasy)

It’s not often you read about a woman heroine with kids. Not unless the kids are dead, long moved beyond needing mothering or the kids show up at the end as part of the happily ever after. So maybe I’m a tiny bit biased, but I loved getting to read from the perspective of a woman who doesn’t have illusions of grandeur, doesn’t have the desires that spark grand, sprawling adventures and is making most of her choices based on what’s best for her family rather than the rest of the world. And the world of Renthia is still its conflicted self, dark, yet filled with possibility. There were a few obvious plot threads, but when the world is this magical and the story fun, I care far less about being completely surprised at every turn. (Yep, The Deepest Blue is on my list to read come May! Already have it on my bookshelf taunting me!)

The Song of Achilles by Madeline Miller
(Mythological Romance)

I read Circe last year and absolutely adored the story, so picking up its predecessor this year was a no-brainer. I admit, Achilles wasn’t what I expected. I thought there would be more focus on the retelling of the Iliad section of the novel, less focus on Patroclus and Achilles growing up. More grittiness and less drama, yet I found I loved it regardless of expectations. This novel is essentially a crème de la crème of gay fantasy romance and while it’s not so much a retelling of Greek myth, it uses the setting beautifully. And now I have to wait for Miller to write a new book because there is no more back-list to mine.

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A mention I want to add: I read Foundation (Isaac Asimov) for the first time in April. I’d read all his robots books as a youth and loved them; have reread The Caves of Steel multiple times. While I found Foundation interesting, it wasn’t as eye-opening and intriguing as I think it might have been had I read it while still young enough to be surprised by some of the changes to the economy. I also read Hyperion for the first time, however, I’m holding out on a complete opinion until after I read through more of the series. So much world-building though!

Pirate Mirror: RibbonSight #10

The tenth and final short story in the RibbonSight Series has been published on Amazon, B&N and Smashwords and is now available for $0.99.

Pirate Mirror: RibbonSight #10

During a teamed assignment to take out a crew of raiding Eatari pirates, Aly finds herself alone, fighting a burner whose abilities resemble her own. Now, with this mage literally burning down her neck, Aly finally starts to realize the very real hope in Sevori’s questions, but it could be far too late to matter for this burner isn’t just her equal…he’s better.

On Kindle
On B&N
On Smashwords

For some reason, the story doesn’t show up on the B&N site when I search for it, though the product page seems fine when I access it from my titles page. This is my first time publishing straight through PubIt so I’m not sure why this is happening.

Only Council Aid: RibbonSight #9

The ninth short story (out of ten) in the RibbonSight Short Story Series has been published on Amazon and Smashwords and is now available for $0.99.

Only Council Aid: RibbonSight #9

After receiving a frantic message, Aly and Sevori rush to help another pair in a nearby town. They arrive to find the town in the midst of being destroyed and the townspeople defenseless against the attacking mage. A mage so skilled it might be beyond Aly and Sevori’s abilities to save everyone.

On Kindle

On Smashwords

New Covers

Alright. While my stick figures are amazing, I have discovered that my cover skills…not so much. The content of my stories has never changed, but I think I’ve uploaded new covers for my RibbonSight series a total of six times now.

I think I’ve finally managed to get them looking like…well, book covers.

They’ve been uploaded to Amazon and Smashwords, though everywhere else will have a delay before they are updated. So now they have a whole new look, hopefully one that’s more professional in quality.