Tag Archives: short story

Recommended Short Fiction: EVERQUEST by Naomi Kanakia & A COMPLETE TRANSCRIPT OF [REDACTED]’s VIDEO CHANNEL by Rhiannon Rasmussen


These two stories deal with completely different topics within their underlying themes, but on their surface they are about a person and their relationship with some sort of online persona they’ve crafted.

EVERQUEST by Naomi Kanakia is about a man named Gopal who receives an online multiplayer role-playing game as a present. He crafts a female character, named Gayatri, and begins to fall into that fantasy world more and more. This story is about outward expression, the journey to acceptance of oneself and the cultural and familial pressure that can stall someone on their journey of discovery. Published in Lightspeed Magazine.

A COMPLETE TRANSCRIPT OF [REDACTED]’s VIDEO CHANNEL by Rhiannon Rasmussen is, just as it says, a literal translation of one person’s fumbling attempts to craft their own video channel. The videos—featuring how-tos and cooking recipes—devolve into disturbing territory that becomes almost comical in nature as you watch read through these disasters. Published in Diabolical Plots.


Recommended Short Fiction: THE SYCAMORE AND THE SYBIL by Alix E. Harrow & GROW, DIVIDE, SACRIFICE, THRIVE by Jo Miles


This week’s recommended stories deal with mistreatment from family and the strength it takes to stand tall against that mistreatment.

THE SYCAMORE AND THE SYBIL by Alix E. Harrow is about a woman-turned-sycamore who can do nothing but remember a time when she’d been human while she watches another woman fall to an abusive man under her branches. Published in Uncanny Magazine.

GROW, DIVIDE, SACRIFICE, THRIVE by Jo Miles is a poignant tale about Chris, a nonbinary person who has felt cut off from their family their whole life, particularly when it came to the family’s traditional sourdough making. The family yeast, who the family pretends can communicate with them, seems to have more a spot in the family than they do, which pushes Chris to finally act. Published in Metaphorosis Magazine.


Eligibility Post for 2020 Awards!

I have never written one of these before despite having stories published in prior years. But there’s a first for everything!

In 2020 I had a grand total of 1 stories published :) But it’s a story I’m proud of; it’s a story I think touches the hearts of most, if not all, writers.

Click to Read!

The Pop-up Artisan of Drink Me Café, published in October in both print and audio at Cast of Wonders, is my one eligible story during this awards season. It’s about 3400 words long and is about a girl escaping her grief and subsequent abuse and neglect by hiding in a café every one of us wishes existed, a café that changes decor and coffee offerings to match favorite fantasy and science-fiction books and shows. There she reads to find solace in other worlds as she struggles at home, at school, and in life. There’s something about her situation that speaks to the dreamers in us, just as there’s something magical in those cafés and coffee shops writers frequent :)

I hope you’ll give it a read or a listen in consideration of your nominations this year!

<3 Marie C.

Recommended Short Fiction: Makeisha in Time by Rachael K. Jones & I, Crocodile by Jacinta Escudos

I’ve been wanting to do recommended short fiction for a while, and now, after two years of keeping track of almost everything I’ve been reading, I’m finally getting down to the business of sharing short stories I’ve absolutely loved in the hopes that you’ll give them a read too.

The first two of the year I’d like to talk about are both from Constelación’s sample issue #0.5, a taste of things to come for this new magazine. Both were exemplary.

MAKEISHA IN TIME by Rachael K. Jones is a tale about a girl who lives countless lives across history. She is swept back in time at random moments, only to be returned in the exact same place and moment from when and where she’d disappeared. It’s a tale about historical erasure, about choosing what lives we wish to live.

I, CROCODILE by Jacinta Escudos is another powerful tale about a girl who can transform into a crocodile in the river. It deals with forced genital mutilation and the adults who propagate the ideas behind it. But especially, it deals with the fury of the ones who resist.

My Odyssey Workshop Experience: The Salon & Games

One of the other meetings that occurred, this one weekly, were Friday meet-ups that either took the shape of a Salon discussion or a Game.

Maybe about half the class showed up to these events, some people starting the event and then making their excuses. I think I went to all of them.

The Salons centered around stories or story-telling methods generally. We discussed pre-class readings, both fiction and non-fiction, where I was intrigued to discover just how the views changed from person to person on the pieces we’d read. There was one story especially that many of us read it completely differently, which was incredible and eye-opening.

That being said, it was the Games that were the most fun! :) We’d have to come up with plot additions, with changes in character motivation. Or we’d have to craft world-building additions that wouldn’t contradict a prior rule already stated.

And, of course, there were options to contest an addition to the working plot or world, etc. So there were plenty of arguments as to what would work, what wouldn’t work. Continue reading