Tag Archives: science-fiction

“Drop Shipment Standard Procedure” Published in Dark Matter Magazine Issue 3!

My flash piece “Drop Shipment Standard Procedure” has been published in Dark Matter Magazine in their third issue! This is my fourth publication of the year!

“Drop Shipment Standard Procedure” began its life as a flash challenge. My prompt had to do with nomads of some sort, sparking forth a nomadic space group that spanned many, many ships traveling together a la Battlestar Galatica style, but without the military aspect.

The story revolves around a drop shipment with a spattering of language and translation difficulties interspersed within :D

You can buy the third issue of Dark Matter Magazine with “Drop Shipment Standard Procedure” here!

<3 Marie C.

Recommended Book: MARS GIRLS by Mary Turzillo


MARS GIRLS
Mary Turzillo

In a not-so-distant future on a Mars begun to be colonized, two girls get into and out of trouble time and again. Nanoannie is desperate to escape her hab (habitation) and experience life away from her parents, who she sees as domineering and overbearing. While Kapera is struggling to say goodbye to the home she knows because her parents want to take her to Earth in order to get treatment for her leukemia.

Neither of them have met in the flesh, but given that options are limited when on Mars, friendships formed can be strange company. When Kapera rolls up alone in her family’s rover to Nanoannie’s hab, Nanoannie jumps at the chance to investigate whatever might be going down at Kapera’s family pharm.

And when they find out that Kapera’s parents are missing, the girls are off! Stumbling into coups-in-progress, uncovering frozen corpses, being kidnapped, escaping, kidnapped again, and even married off, by friends and enemies and sects within friends and enemies. Confused and, in Kapera’s case, sick, the girls uncover a plot that involves Kapera’s own parents and the research they’d been knee-deep within. A plot that might just take them and most people on Mars on a one-way trip to no man’s land. Continue reading

“Veins of My Sister” Published in Deep Magic’s Spring 2021 Issue!

I’m excited to announce that my novelette “Veins of My Sister” has been published in the pages of Deep Magic’s Spring 2021 issue! :) This is my third publication of the year and only my second ever novelette sold!

“Veins of My Sister” is a science-fiction tale set in the far-flung future deep in the distant recesses of space.

Long after a war base has been deserted, it still thrives, now as a city called Tews, led by Jes, woman of grit who will stop at nothing to keep her home safe.

But it’s not just the people who give Tews its reputation as a force to be reckoned with, for it was a veined city, moveable through space, weapons reacting as fast as the thoughts of whoever controlled her. Only now, there are problems. One such being Jes’s sister returning abruptly, arriving into Tews completely ignorant of the bounty Jes has put on her head. And she didn’t come alone…

This is a tale about desperation and loyalty. Of sisterhood, with all the differences therein. But most of all, “Veins of My Sister” is a space adventure about finding and accepting your place as well as those of others.

And that cover! It’s beyond gorgeous! I want that dress! That cover is stunning and I’m so proud to be in the pages of this issue :) :)

You can buy the Spring 2021 issue of Deep Magic here!

<3 Marie C.

Recommended Book: DRAGONWRITER edited by Todd McCaffrey


DRAGONWRITER:
A Tribute to Anne McCaffrey and Pern

ed by Todd McCaffrey

The dedication for Dragonwriter is to “all those who have found solace in the Worlds of Anne McCaffrey and Pern” and that’s exactly who this collection is for. All of us who’ve dreamed of her dragons, of flying her brainships, of being a Talent in our own right.

These essays all encompass different aspects of the same great woman, yet cross and overlap consistently to paint a picture of this larger than life, mischievous person who is Anne McCaffrey. Some of the essays head into the history of McCaffrey’s career, detailing certain aspects or shedding light on events that became turning points. Some of them give larger, more macro-oriented overviews. And some are more personal, more focused on the relationship between essay writer and McCaffrey.

All of the essays come from the writer’s specific viewpoint, highlighting the ways they knew McCaffrey and how she affected or influenced them. The writers are an eclectic bunch, with some of them being fellow writers who were either inspired by or mentored by McCaffrey in some way. Some of them knew her in other ways, such as being an editor she worked with, convention runners, a singer/songwriter, a cover artist, and, of course, her children, each of whom leave their own mark within these pages.

I recommend this non-fiction book for all who fell in love with McCaffrey’s fiction, regardless whether it was Pern who first brought you to her work or another of her series, especially as The Ship Who Sang is referenced a great deal, particularly in one emotional essay. This will only heighten your appreciation for these stories, as well as making you fall in love with the woman behind the words.


Recommended Short Fiction: ALL WORLDS LEFT BEHIND by Iona Datt Sharma & WINGS OF LIGHT by Anna Madden


This week the stories are about leaving worlds and homes and histories in the past. They deal with heartache, yes, but also of looking forward, into the future.

ALL WORLDS LEFT BEHIND by Iona Datt Sharma is about a woman named Priya whose family had access to a portal world. But as she prepares for both a funeral and her own wedding, she realizes that she is losing her hold on this portal world, that it might very well slip from her grasp. Published in khōréō magazine.

WINGS OF LIGHT by ANNA MADDEN is a tale about an ant warrior desperate to defend her colony from attack, yet is given a responsibility that doesn’t conform to the life and death she had expected for herself. She’ll have to come to terms with this new responsibility, for the future of her colony depends on it. Published in Hexagon Magazine.